Wow. Just… wow.

Never tell me that everything in a novel has to be obsessively plotted out and planned. Not after what I just experienced today.

When I began writing this afternoon, I was well over 25,000 words and the big, climactic scene in SHADA was about to begin. I was completely at a loss as to what to do with it. I know the typical expectations of the paranormal suspense genre. I understood the conflicts and inner turmoil that had brought all my characters, but especially Ember, to this point. And the best idea I had involved a vague notion of EVPs or a floating Ouija board spontaneously responding to questions.

In other words, cheesy genre concepts I wasn’t completely happy with. And even what I had written so far was evidence of my aversion to those solutions. It was as though my creative instincts were telling me no, even though my conscious mind had no firm Plan B waiting in the wings.

But I began to write, and, well…

…don’t tell me that everything in a novel has to be obsessively plotted out and planned. It doesn’t. It just doesn’t.

As I was writing, I just let the characters and the situation take over. I wrote without thinking about it. I wrote the moment and just let things happen.

And a solution appeared.

I’d love to tell you about it. Really, I’m burning up here with anticipation to see what others think of it. I want to shout for joy and share this experience about how I solved the biggest conundrum in all of SHADA … what to do with the climactic scene … and how the best possible, most unexpected way of handling things just … appeared on paper as I wrote.

It’s a perfect, perfect moment that, in a real out-of-left-field way, but in a way that completely works, just does everything that needs doing in a way that will take readers by surprise and, hopefully, leave them satisfied.

But.

If I did that … if I shared what appeared as I typed the scene out here … it would spoil the entire SHADA short novel. Absolutely ruin the surprise. No, this is something I simply have to keep to myself. It has to be part of experiencing the story, or it might never make sense. And it certainly wouldn’t be fully appreciated out of context.

No, I’m keeping my trap shut on this little tidbit. If you want to know, you’ll have to wait until SHADA is released. You’ll have to buy the book and read it for yourself. And since it’s going to be released at only $0.99, there’s practically no sane reason not to.

But that’s a ways off yet. I am at just over 27,000 words and have a few thousand more to go before everything wraps up, giving the novel closure. Then there is the beta-reading and the editing and the revisions yet to come. But trust me, I can now say with full confidence, it’s going to be worth the wait.

SHADA has a resolution that will take you by surprise. Guaranteed.

And until I actually wrote it, I never even saw it coming.

So, again, never tell me that everything in a novel has to be obsessively plotted out and planned. Not after what I just experienced today.

3 thoughts on “Wow. Just… wow.

    1. Thanks for the enthusiastic interest! And I promise to share the whole thing … when the book is released! :)

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